This briefing provides an update on the size of the House of Lords and recent statements on the issue following the new peerages announced this year. As at 20 November 2020, the size of the absolute membership was 820. This represented an increase in the size of the membership from the end of the 2017–19 session, but is lower than the peak of 845 at the end of the 2015–16 session.

These regulations make it an offence not to self-isolate if instructed to by certain local authority and health officials. This would apply to those who have tested positive for coronavirus or who have been in close contact with someone else who has tested positive. The regulations came into force on 28 September 2020 and the House of Lords is due to consider them on 14 October 2020.

  • In Focus

    The Social Security (Up-rating of Benefits) Bill is due to be considered in the House of Lords on 13 October 2020. It allows for particular state pension benefits to be reviewed and potentially increased, despite an expected fall in average earnings due to the coronavirus pandemic. The bill received cross-party support in the House of Commons, where it passed all its stages on 1 October 2020.

  • In Focus

    There is currently no cap on the membership of the House of Lords. Some have recommended the introduction of a cap to address concerns about the size of the House. This article discusses recent proposals to cap the membership at 600 and sets out the Government's position. It also contains brief information on recent changes in the size of the House.

  • Research Briefing

    Following the recent announcement of 36 new life peers by Prime Minister Boris Johnson, this briefing provides information and statistics on peers created under the Life Peerages Act 1958. This includes breakdowns by decade and by prime minister. It also contains a list of every life peer appointed under the Act.

  • In Focus

    There is no formal retirement age for members of the House of Lords. However, members can voluntarily retire under the provisions of the House of Lords Reform Act 2014. This article explains how these provisions came into force and details how many members have retired under this legislation so far.

  • In Focus

    Many of the restrictions imposed due to coronavirus have been set out in secondary legislation. This article covers two regulations that were made to relax some of the restrictions on what businesses can open, including pubs, restaurants and certain beauty salons. It has been published ahead of a Lords debate on the legislation.

  • Research Briefing

    The bill would provide the Government with new delegated powers to update or amend the UK’s regulatory framework for medical devices and for human and veterinary medicines. Much of the current UK regulatory framework is based on EU regulations and directives. It would also allow a new information system to be introduced covering data on medical devices and would consolidate and expand enforcement provisions.

  • Research Briefing

    Hong Kong has had 118 confirmed cases of the coronavirus disease and three deaths as at 10 March 2020. Hong Kong’s government has sought to contain the virus through strict quarantine and travel restrictions and by closing some public services, including schools. However, concerns have been raised about the social and economic impact of the measures taken.

  • Research Briefing

    This House of Lords Library Briefing has been prepared in advance of the debate due to take place on 6 February 2020 on the motion moved by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath (Labour) that “this House takes note of the National Health Service’s performance in relation to its priority area targets; and the impact of adult social care pressures on patients of the National Health Service, and their safety”.