Rising cost of agricultural fertiliser and feed: Causes, impacts and government policy

Agricultural fertiliser and feed prices have increased significantly in recent months. The price rises have been driven largely by global pressures including increased demand, the war in Ukraine and higher energy costs. Record prices are pushing up costs for farmers as well as for consumers via the cost of produce and animal products. The government has announced a range of measures in response, including more frequent payment of subsidies and a sustainable farming initiative.

Rising cost of agricultural fertiliser and feed: Causes, impacts and government policy

Pig farming industry in England

Pig farmers have faced a number of pressures in recent months, including labour shortages and rising costs of production. The National Pig Association has described the situation as a “crisis”. This article summarises the findings of a recent House of Commons Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee report on labour shortages in the farming sector. In addition, it explores reaction to the government’s package of support measures for the pig industry.

Pig farming industry in England
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    Ash dieback and the health of English trees

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    Queen’s Speech 2022: Agriculture, the natural environment and animal welfare

    The 2019 Conservative Party manifesto included commitments to protect the natural environment and improve animal welfare. However, the Government has yet to fulfil its manifesto commitment to introduce legislation banning imports of hunting trophies. The Government has proposed changes to the ways in which natural landscapes are managed following the 2019 landscapes review. It has also said it is considering measures to permit greater use of some gene-edited organisms in agriculture.

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    Game Birds (Cage Breeding) Bill [HL]

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    Changing the regulation of certain genetically modified plants: motion not to approve new laws

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    Glue Traps (Offences) Bill

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    Animals (Penalty Notices) Bill

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    Hungry for Change: Food, Poverty, Health and the Environment Committee report

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    Environment Bill: Briefing for Lords Stages

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    Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill [HL]

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    Queen’s Speech 2021: agriculture and animal welfare

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