Local Authority (Housing Allocation) Bill [HL]: HL Bill 9 of 2022–23

The Local Authority (Housing Allocation) Bill [HL] is a private member’s bill introduced by Lord Mann (non-affiliated). The bill is due to have its second reading in the House of Lords on 8 July 2022. The bill would require local planning authorities to establish targets for the allocation of land for new housing in England in consultation with their local communities. The timescales for meeting these targets would be set by the secretary of state.

Local Authority (Housing Allocation) Bill [HL]: HL Bill 9 of 2022–23

Social Housing (Regulation) Bill [HL]: HL Bill 21 of 2022–23

The Social Housing (Regulation) Bill [HL] is a government bill that seeks to facilitate a new, proactive approach to regulating social housing landlords on consumer issues such as safety, transparency and tenant engagement. It also aims to refine the existing economic regulatory regime and strengthen the sector regulator’s powers. The House of Lords is scheduled to debate the bill’s second reading on 27 June 2022.

Social Housing (Regulation) Bill [HL]: HL Bill 21 of 2022–23

Right to buy: Past, present and future

The policy known as ‘right to buy’ gives local authority housing tenants the power to purchase their home at a discounted rate. The government has recently announced plans to extend the right to buy to housing association tenants. The conditions of right to buy have been regularly changed since its introduction in 1980. Recent trials have tested how it could be extended to housing association tenants.

Right to buy: Past, present and future
  • In Focus

    The Equality Act 2010: Impact on disabled people

    The Equality Act 2010 is the main piece of domestic legislation governing disabled people’s rights in the UK; it replaced several separate pieces of discrimination legislation. A 2016 House of Lords committee review contained recommendations for improvements to the 2010 Act. In September 2021, the House of Lords Liaison Committee examined whether these recommendations had been implemented. The committee’s 2021 report is due to be discussed in the House of Lords on 21 June 2022.

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    Queen’s Speech 2022: Levelling up, housing and communities

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  • Research Briefing

    Down Syndrome Bill

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  • Research Briefing

    Building Safety Bill

    The Building Safety Bill is scheduled for second reading in the House of Lords on 2 February 2022. It completed its House of Commons stages on 19 January 2022. The bill would implement a number of policies aimed at improving the regulation of building safety in England, particularly multiple dwelling buildings over 18 metres tall.

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    Leaseholders: fire and building safety

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    Cost of living: housing affordability

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    Housing developments on functional flood plains

    Around 5.2 million properties in England are at risk from flooding. The Environment Agency has said that if current planning outcomes continue, this number could double in the next 50 years. The Government has recently consulted on proposals to change England’s planning policies to better respond to flood risks. The House of Commons environment committee and the Royal Institute of British Architects have raised concerns over the Government’s current planning framework.

  • In Focus

    Motions on recent changes to planning rules

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  • In Focus

    Covid-19: housing evictions

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  • In Focus

    Coming Home: Calls for a long-term housing strategy in England

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