On 19 June 2023, second reading of the British Nationality (Regularisation of Past Practice) Bill is scheduled to take place in the House of Lords. It is a government bill and it has completed its passage through the House of Commons. 

The bill would deal with a legal issue that has come to light which casts doubt on the British citizenship of some people born in the UK to European Economic Area (EEA) or Swiss nationals between 1 January 1983 and 1 October 2000. A recent court case has brought into question whether EEA or Swiss nationals living in the UK during this period should have been considered “settled” for nationality purposes, and therefore whether children born in the UK to them at that time could be considered British citizens under the British Nationality Act 1981. Home Office guidance and government policy across the years had stated that people born to these nationals were British citizens and this was relied upon. However, since the judgment, the Home Office has had to pause any first-time passport applications from this group. 

The government has committed to dealing with the situation as quickly as possible and is fast-tracking the legislation. The bill passed all its House of Commons stages on 6 June 2023 and it received cross-party support.


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