Documents to download

This briefing is one of three prepared ahead of the three days of debate in the House of Lords on the Queen’s Speech, scheduled to take place between 7 and 9 January 2020. The briefings detail the legislative and policy announcements made by the Government, in the Queen’s Speech and in the associated documents, and provide links to further reading.

This briefing looks at home affairs, justice, constitutional affairs and devolved affairs, providing details on the following legislative announcements: 

  • Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill
  • Serious Violence Bill
  • Domestic Abuse Bill
  • Police Powers and Protections Bill
  • Extradition (Provisional Arrest) Bill
  • Counter Terrorism (Sentencing and Release) Bill
  • Sentencing Bill and Sentencing (Pre-consolidation Amendments) Bill
  • Prisoners (Disclosure of Information About Victims) Bill
  • Divorce, Dissolution and Separation Bill
  • Legislation regarding espionage and foreign national offenders

It also covers proposals to repeal the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011, to set up a royal commission on the criminal justice process, to establish a constitution, democracy and rights commission and the Government’s policies concerning the devolved administrations.


Documents to download

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