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The Non-Domestic Rating (Lists) Bill is a government bill that brings forward by one year the next revaluation for non-domestic rates in England and Wales to 1 April 2021. It also moves the cycle of new rating lists thereafter in England from every five years to every three years. The Government believes that this change will make business ratings more responsive to economic conditions. Wales is not changing its cycle.

The bill was introduced in the House of Commons on 12 June 2019. It had its second reading on 17 June 2019 and completed its House of Commons stages, without amendment, on 22 July 2019. During the House of Commons stages, Labour “welcomed” bringing forward the new ratings list by a year but described the bill as “narrow”. The Labour Party said it shared concerns raised by several stakeholders about the impact of business rates on the retail sector, the viability of businesses and the future of high streets and town centres. At public bill committee stage, organisations such as the British Retail Consortium called on the Government to reform the business rates system. In addition, more than 50 British retailers, signed a joint letter in August 2019 to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sajid Javid, asking the Government to freeze increases in business rates.

The bill was introduced into the Lords on 23 July 2019 and is scheduled to receive its second reading on 30 September 2019.


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