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As at 17 June 2019, there were 215 female Members of the House of Lords, out of a gross membership of 800 (these figures include those Members currently on leave of absence or disqualified for holding certain offices). This figure represented approximately 27 percent of the membership. The number of female Members were made up of: 

  • 208 life Peers appointed under the Life Peerages Act 1958; 
  • One Peer appointed under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 (Baroness Hale of Richmond); 
  • One excepted hereditary Peer under the House of Lords Act 1999 (the Countess of Mar); 
  • Five Bishops (following the enactment of the Lords Spiritual (Women) Act 2015). 

Since 1958, including the one Member appointed under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876, there have been 302 female life Peers appointed; these are listed in the table in appendix 1.  In addition, there have been 25 female Members who have sat in the House of Lords by virtue of a hereditary peerage; these are listed in the table in appendix 2. 


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