Documents to download

The Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Bill [HL] was introduced in the House of Lords by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), on 18 October 2017. It is scheduled to have its second reading in the House of Lords on 1 November 2017.

The Government has stated that the Bill is necessary to enable the UK to implement sanctions—both those that the UK is obliged to implement as a member of the UN, and those that the UK might choose to implement for its own foreign policy purposes—after Brexit, as neither existing domestic legislation, nor EU legislation converted into domestic legislation by the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill would provide a sufficient legal basis.

The Bill would create powers for the Government to make regulations to impose sanctions to comply with UN and other international obligations; to prevent terrorism; for national security or international peace and security; or to further a foreign policy objective. The Bill would allow financial, immigration, trade, aircraft and shipping sanctions to be imposed, and would contain powers to allow additional types of sanctions to be added to this list in future. Sanctions could also be targeted at particular individuals or entities (‘designated persons’) or specified ships. The Bill would allow for regulations to create exceptions and licences to allow activities to take place that would otherwise be prohibited or restricted by sanctions. It would also provide for there to be ministerial and judicial review processes to allow individuals and organisations to challenge sanctions imposed on them. It would allow regulations to be made to update existing provisions on anti-money laundering and terrorist financing, particularly the Money Laundering Regulations 2017, to be updated after the UK’s exit from the EU.


Documents to download

Related posts

  • Afghanistan: hunger, poverty, and resettlement efforts

    Following the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan, the country is on the brink of a humanitarian and economic crisis. United Nations agencies report that significant proportions of the population are at risk from malnutrition, particularly young children, and as much as 97% of the population could fall below the poverty line. At the same time, many Afghans continue to seek to leave Afghanistan and the UK is engaged in efforts to resettle those who qualify to come to the country via several schemes. However, the key Afghan Citizens’ Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) is yet to commence operations.

    Afghanistan: hunger, poverty, and resettlement efforts
  • Current Affairs Digest: Economics (November 2021)

    Catch up on developments in economics this month. We take a look at a report by the Centre for Social Justice on how public procurement could help with levelling up, and demystify current debates around inflation and whether the Bank of England should raise interest rates.

    Current Affairs Digest: Economics (November 2021)
  • Accusations of genocide against Uyghurs in Xinjiang, China

    Several countries and parliaments have accused China of committing genocide against Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities in Xinjiang. The UK Government maintains that only a competent court can make this determination. However, the Times reported that the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, Elizabeth Truss, had previously accused China of committing genocide. The House of Lords is due to take note of these reported remarks on 25 November 2021.

    Accusations of genocide against Uyghurs in Xinjiang, China