Documents to download

The Unpaid Work Experience (Prohibition) Bill [HL] 2017–19 is a private member’s bill introduced by Lord Holmes of Richmond (Conservative). It had its first reading on 27 June 2017, and is due to have its second reading on 27 October 2017. The Bill contains two clauses, and would prohibit unpaid work experience lasting for longer than four weeks, by making it compulsory for employers to pay the national minimum wage to individuals undertaking such work experience. This would apply across the United Kingdom.

Key Provisions

The Bill would amend the National Minimum Wage Act 1998, so that the Act applies to individuals “participating in a scheme designed to provide work experience for a continuous or non-continuous period which exceeds four weeks”. Individuals undertaking work experience with the same employer for more than four weeks, who are above compulsory school age but under the age of 26, would receive the rate of the national minimum wage in accordance with their age. The Bill would clarify the definition of ‘employer’ in the Act to include “any organisation which provides an individual with work experience”. The Bill defines ‘work experience’ to mean “observing, replicating, assisting with and carrying out any task with the aim of gaining experience of a particular workplace, organisation, industry or work-related activity”.


Documents to download

Related posts

  • International Women’s Day 2024: Economic inclusion of women

    Economic disparities persist between men and women globally, with women generally facing lower pay, higher levels of informal employment, and more unpaid care work than men. Internationally, the UK government has made commitments to promote gender equality and economic inclusion, but concerns have been raised about the level of aid funding. In the UK, the government has expanded childcare places for working parents and supported private members’ bills to make changes to employment law.

    International Women’s Day 2024: Economic inclusion of women
  • Higher education: Contribution to the economy and levelling up

    The economic output of the UK higher education sector is estimated to be at least £116bn and graduates often experience better employment outcomes than non-graduates. Improving skills features in the government’s levelling up strategy and ministers have said that higher education institutions play a vital part in supporting regional economies. However, some stakeholders have criticised the government’s plans to restrict access to certain higher education courses and for not putting enough emphasis on the benefits provided by the sector.

    Higher education: Contribution to the economy and levelling up