Documents to download

The Unpaid Work Experience (Prohibition) Bill [HL] 2017–19 is a private member’s bill introduced by Lord Holmes of Richmond (Conservative). It had its first reading on 27 June 2017, and is due to have its second reading on 27 October 2017. The Bill contains two clauses, and would prohibit unpaid work experience lasting for longer than four weeks, by making it compulsory for employers to pay the national minimum wage to individuals undertaking such work experience. This would apply across the United Kingdom.

Key Provisions

The Bill would amend the National Minimum Wage Act 1998, so that the Act applies to individuals “participating in a scheme designed to provide work experience for a continuous or non-continuous period which exceeds four weeks”. Individuals undertaking work experience with the same employer for more than four weeks, who are above compulsory school age but under the age of 26, would receive the rate of the national minimum wage in accordance with their age. The Bill would clarify the definition of ‘employer’ in the Act to include “any organisation which provides an individual with work experience”. The Bill defines ‘work experience’ to mean “observing, replicating, assisting with and carrying out any task with the aim of gaining experience of a particular workplace, organisation, industry or work-related activity”.


Documents to download

Related posts

  • The Covid-19 pandemic has had multiple effects on the lives of young people. These include worry for vulnerable family members and a change in normal routines. School closures have often exacerbated feelings of isolation and loneliness. Young people with existing mental health needs may have experienced a disruptive break in regular care as a result of the pandemic. This article examines the impact the pandemic has had on young people’s mental health, and what the Government’s response is.

  • In August 2020, Northampton saw an increase in the number of Covid-19 cases. A large number of these transmissions were traced back to the Greencore factory in Northampton. On 21 August 2020, workers and their households were told to self-isolate for 14 days to limit the risk of further spread of the disease in the community, and to avoid a local lockdown. This article looks at the regulations introduced to enforce the restrictions.

  • The UK’s arts and entertainment sector has been one of the areas worst affected by the coronavirus pandemic. The decline in revenues and the number of workers furloughed over the past few months is second only to the accommodation and food sector. This article examines the impact of the pandemic on the UK’s cultural industry and the Government’s recently announced support package worth £1.57 billion aimed at helping the sector recover.