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This Library Note provides background reading for the debate to be held on Thursday 25 October: “the standards of service for looked-after children and, in particular, the Government’s response to changes in residential childcare in the light of recent child protection failures”. It considers recent analysis of the standards of service received by looked-after children and what measures have been undertaken to improve these standards. It also considers what inadequacies might be identified in the provision of care for looked-after children in residential settings following the prosecution of members of an organised gang based in Rochdale which targeted children in care homes.


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