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This Library Note provides information on the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill, which is due for second reading in the House of Lords on 21 November 2011. The Note is intended to be read in conjunction with two House of Commons Library Research Papers: Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill (4 July 2011, RP 11/53) and Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill: Committee Stage Report (20 October 2011, RP 11/70) which provide background information and summarise the second reading debate and committee stage in the House of Commons. This note summarises the report stage and third reading debate in the House of Commons.


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