Documents to download

The Merchant Shipping (Homosexual Conduct) Bill is a House of Commons private member’s bill introduced by John Glen (Conservative MP for Salisbury) and is sponsored in the House of Lords by Baroness Scott of Bybrook (Conservative). The Bill has completed all stages in the House of Commons and is scheduled to have its second reading in the House of Lords on 6 April 2017.

Provisions

The Bill would repeal sections 146(4) and 147(3) of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 which no longer have legal effect but remain in statute. These provisions originally allowed for the dismissal of a member of the crew of a merchant ship on the grounds of homosexual acts. Such a dismissal would now be illegal under subsequent legislation, including the Equality Act 2010.

Reasons for Introducing the Bill

In the Explanatory Notes that it produced for the Merchant Shipping (Homosexual Conduct) Bill on behalf of the Bill’s sponsor, the Government outlined the following reasons why it believed repealing sections 146(4) and 147(3) of the 1994 Act was necessary: while these sections had no legal effect, they might be still be misinterpreted; they were no longer compatible with current values; and their removal would tidy up the statute book. 


Documents to download

Related posts

  • In May 2019, the House of Lords EU Committee published a report into the future of UK-EU surface transport links. Continuing disagreement between UK and EU negotiators over aspects of the future relationship in transport matters has helped put the brakes on progress in the current negotiations, with talks on the future of road haulage rights in particular reportedly at a standstill.

  • The sentencing of offenders whose crimes lead to the death of an emergency service worker can vary depending upon the conviction received. The Harper’s Law campaign has called for life sentences to be imposed in instances where an emergency service worker is killed as a direct result of a crime. This article discusses life sentences, minimum terms, and recent calls for change to sentencing in England and Wales. This is due to be the subject of an oral question in the House of Lords on 1 October 2020.