Documents to download

The Council Tax Valuation Bands Bill [HL] is a private member’s bill introduced by Lord Marlesford (Conservative). The Bill received its first reading in the House of Lords on 1 June 2015 and is scheduled to receive its second reading on 11 September 2015. Lord Marlesford has prepared Explanatory Notes to the Bill.

The Bill seeks to make provision for the introduction of a new set of council tax valuation bands which would be applicable to all dwellings bought or sold after 1 April 2000. The Bill, if enacted, would:

• Compel the Secretary of State responsible to introduce regulations to establish a new set of council tax valuation bands.
• Require that all dwellings bought or sold since 1 April 2000 be placed in the updated bands.
• Ensure that any dwelling that has not been bought or sold since 1 April 2000 would continue to attract council tax according to the valuation bands set out in the Local Government Finance Act 1992.
• Alter the proportions between each valuation band. The Bill stipulates that the proportions would be: 6: 8: 16: 24: 36: 48: 100: 250.

The Bill states that the new range of values for each council tax valuation band would be as follows:

• below £250,000
• between £250,001 and £500,000
• between £500,001 and £1,000,000
• between £1,000,001 and £2,000,000
• between £2,000,001 and £5,000,000
• between £5,000,001 and £10,000,000
• between £10,000,001 and £20,000,000
• over £20,000,000

Lord Marlesford has stated that “the extremely good system of council tax needs updating”, and has argued that it is not “acceptable in today’s world that the most expensive property pay only three times the amount of the humblest and cheapest property”. Furthermore, he has suggested that his proposals are a “neat system, because it would require no valuations at all”.


Documents to download

Related posts

  • International Women’s Day 2024: Economic inclusion of women

    Economic disparities persist between men and women globally, with women generally facing lower pay, higher levels of informal employment, and more unpaid care work than men. Internationally, the UK government has made commitments to promote gender equality and economic inclusion, but concerns have been raised about the level of aid funding. In the UK, the government has expanded childcare places for working parents and supported private members’ bills to make changes to employment law.

    International Women’s Day 2024: Economic inclusion of women
  • Higher education: Contribution to the economy and levelling up

    The economic output of the UK higher education sector is estimated to be at least £116bn and graduates often experience better employment outcomes than non-graduates. Improving skills features in the government’s levelling up strategy and ministers have said that higher education institutions play a vital part in supporting regional economies. However, some stakeholders have criticised the government’s plans to restrict access to certain higher education courses and for not putting enough emphasis on the benefits provided by the sector.

    Higher education: Contribution to the economy and levelling up