• Research Briefing

    Northern Ireland Budget Bill: HL Bill 94 of 2022–23

    In the absence of functioning devolved institutions the UK government has intervened to set Northern Ireland’s budget. The Northern Ireland Budget Bill provides the relevant authorisations and appropriations for the full 2022/23 financial year and includes provisions to allow public spending to continue into the early months of the 2023/24 financial year. The bill passed has been fast-tracked through the House of Commons and its second reading in the House of Lords is due to take place on 7 February 2022.

  • In Focus

    Cost of living: Impact of rising costs on disabled people

    Disabled individuals and their households have, on average, lower incomes than their non-disabled counterparts. They often incur additional costs related to the treatment and mitigation of their disability. Furthermore, they typically spend a greater share of their income on food and energy, the commodities driving the current surge in inflation. In recognition of Disability History Month—running from 16 November to 16 December this year—this article considers how disabled individuals and their households are impacted by the rising cost of living.

  • Research Briefing

    Finance Bill 2022-23

    The Finance Bill is a government bill intended to give lasting statutory effect to the tax measures announced in the November 2022 autumn statement. The bill completed its passage through the House of Commons, unamended, on 30 November 2022 and was introduced in the House of Lords on 1 December 2022. A second reading debate is due to take place in the House of Lords on 20 December 2022.

  • In Focus

    Autumn statement 2022: Key announcements and analysis

    The Chancellor of the Exchequer Jeremy Hunt presented the autumn statement 2022 to the House of Commons on 17 November 2022. It was the first fiscal event to be accompanied by an Office for Budget Responsibility forecast since the spring statement on 23 March 2022. The chancellor said that the government’s key priorities were stability, growth and public services, and that difficult decisions were required to reduce inflation and mortgage rate rises.

  • In Focus

    Transition away from LIBOR

    This article sets out the transition away from LIBOR which, until recently, was a key benchmark set of interest rates underpinning trillions of pounds worth of financial contracts. The article has been written ahead of a House of Lords question for short debate on the use of LIBOR.

Total results (page 3 of 3)